Traditional recipes

We Have the Menu to This Sunday’s Emmy Awards Governors Ball

We Have the Menu to This Sunday’s Emmy Awards Governors Ball

This Sunday, Kevin Spacey, Anthony Hopkins, Jane Fonda, Alec Baldwin, and hundreds of other celebrities and members of the media will be tasting dishes from Patina Group chefs Joachim Splichal, Gregg Wiele, and Frania Mendivil at the 69th Annual Emmy Awards Governors Ball in downtown Los Angeles.

More than 4,000 pounds of heirloom tomatoes, 3,200 pounds of filet mignon, 8,500 fresh black mission figs, and 60 pounds of sugar will be turned into meals for the nominees. All décor and food elements for the Governors Ball are recyclable, repurposed, or biodegradable.

The theme of this year’s ball is “Golden Grandeur.” An epic contemporary setting will be punctuated by a gilded overhead art installation forming a sea of golden waves spanning the entire ballroom. The design emphasizes recurring architectural shapes in a monochromatic gold theme.

The year’s signature Emmy cocktail, The Hillhaven Lodge Fireside, is a combination of whiskey, absinthe, spiced pear liqueur, and fresh lemon juice. Guests entering the ball will be treated to a glass of Ferrari Brut Trentodoc and enjoy flutes of sparkling Ferrari Perlé, Ferrari Perlé Rosé, and Giulio Ferrari Riserva del Fondatore. Sterling Vineyards will offer its Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay to pair with dishes at the largest sit-down dinner in America. (Guests should remember to also sip on the available Fiji water.)

The Patina menu includes a first course called “Last of the Heirlooms,” featuring local heirloom tomatoes, dinosaur plums, red quinoa, charred leek vinaigrette, balsamic jelly, basil, and sea salt; a main course of pan-roasted filet mignon with mission figs, asparagus, purple marble potatoes, roasted red flame grapes, creamy horseradish purée, and mustard sauce; and a decadent Alunga brownie bar with dulce de leche and roasted cherries for dessert.

Splenda Naturals will add the sweetness to the coffee at the Governors Ball; guests can enjoy any of 10 flavors of Philip Ashley chocolates; Audi will supply a fleet of vehicles to chauffeur nominees and presenters to the ceremonies; and L’Oreal Paris will provide celebrity touch-ups backstage at the Emmys and for guests at the Governors Ball.

The Emmy Awards will broadcast on Sunday, September 17, from the Microsoft Theater in downtown Los Angeles and will begin airing on CBS at 5 p.m. Pacific Time and 8 p.m. Eastern Time.


A look at the Emmys’ Governors Ball and how to throw an epic awards party

The 71st Emmy Awards was so good, we could taste it. Literally.

While celebrating the 2019 winners with the stars themselves and Tinseltown notables at the annual Governors Ball, The Track chatted with Matteo Lunelli of Ferrari Trento, the Emmys’ official sparkling wine, about the spread at this year’s after-party and how Hollywood-watchers can channel its spirit in their own bashes during awards season.

“It’s a mix of glamor and Hollywood, with a touch of Italian lifestyle,” Lunelli told the Track of the rooftop shindig taking place directly after the Los Angeles ceremony on Sunday night.

“It’s a tradition about celebrating life and emotions,” he added. “It’s about the pleasure to share positive emotions with other people. The attention that Italians put on food and wine is usually because it’s what you share with the people you love.”

The Track witnessed plenty of positive emotions, as the likes of “Fleabag” winner Phoebe Waller-Bridge, late-night great and presenter Jimmy Kimmel and “Veep” star Julia Louis-Dreyfus sipped on the imported bubbly and downed bites prepared by James Beard legend Joachim Splichal. The swanky soiree, which veered from its traditional sit-down structure for the first time, was strewn with selections of small bites, including: stations laden with sliders and homemade chips, as well as carved prime rib with potatoes au gratin passed trays of street corn ravioli, miniature crab cake sandwiches, Kobe beef meatballs, Brussels sprout frites, Maine lobster dalloped with burrata, paella Valencia and chicken croquettes in addition to Viennese tables covered with the cutest assortment of tiny sweets, such as gold-dusted pots de crème, chocolate-shelled tartlets and raspberry chia seed tapioca pudding.

Obviously, most of us nonfamous folks won’t likely be munching on any precious metals at our own watch-parties as we now follow along the trail to the Oscars. But Lunelli stressed that the key to these bashes is merely embracing the beauty of life. This oh-so Italian philosophy stretches beyond the glitzy, 3,000-guest blowouts like the post-Emmy bash and places simplicity on an equally high pedestal.

To emphasize his point, Lunelli had a few of his own menu suggestions that are totally attainable for us East Coasters and can enable us to capture the essence of awards season, even if we’re thousands of miles away from the red carpet action.

For starters, he proposed a “perfect Italian aperitivo.” “You can start the party with a Parma Ham (prosciutto) and mozzarella with some olives and a glass of Ferrari,” he said. “Also, you can add a touch of Parmesan, which is another great pairing.”

“I like to pair pizza and sparkling wine,” he suggested as another possibility. “In Italy, we like to call it ‘pizza e bollicina,’ which is pizza and bubbles. Probably people here think of pizza with beer, but a pizza margherita with Ferrari Trento Rose is great.”

“If you like seafood, something that I love is fried seafood, like fried squid or calamari, and Ferrari,” he added. “Whenever you have something fried, if you pair it with wine with the right acidity, it changes your mouth and creates a very positive sensation.

“In general, I think it’s about people wanting to be with each other and wanting to share.”


A look at the Emmys’ Governors Ball and how to throw an epic awards party

The 71st Emmy Awards was so good, we could taste it. Literally.

While celebrating the 2019 winners with the stars themselves and Tinseltown notables at the annual Governors Ball, The Track chatted with Matteo Lunelli of Ferrari Trento, the Emmys’ official sparkling wine, about the spread at this year’s after-party and how Hollywood-watchers can channel its spirit in their own bashes during awards season.

“It’s a mix of glamor and Hollywood, with a touch of Italian lifestyle,” Lunelli told the Track of the rooftop shindig taking place directly after the Los Angeles ceremony on Sunday night.

“It’s a tradition about celebrating life and emotions,” he added. “It’s about the pleasure to share positive emotions with other people. The attention that Italians put on food and wine is usually because it’s what you share with the people you love.”

The Track witnessed plenty of positive emotions, as the likes of “Fleabag” winner Phoebe Waller-Bridge, late-night great and presenter Jimmy Kimmel and “Veep” star Julia Louis-Dreyfus sipped on the imported bubbly and downed bites prepared by James Beard legend Joachim Splichal. The swanky soiree, which veered from its traditional sit-down structure for the first time, was strewn with selections of small bites, including: stations laden with sliders and homemade chips, as well as carved prime rib with potatoes au gratin passed trays of street corn ravioli, miniature crab cake sandwiches, Kobe beef meatballs, Brussels sprout frites, Maine lobster dalloped with burrata, paella Valencia and chicken croquettes in addition to Viennese tables covered with the cutest assortment of tiny sweets, such as gold-dusted pots de crème, chocolate-shelled tartlets and raspberry chia seed tapioca pudding.

Obviously, most of us nonfamous folks won’t likely be munching on any precious metals at our own watch-parties as we now follow along the trail to the Oscars. But Lunelli stressed that the key to these bashes is merely embracing the beauty of life. This oh-so Italian philosophy stretches beyond the glitzy, 3,000-guest blowouts like the post-Emmy bash and places simplicity on an equally high pedestal.

To emphasize his point, Lunelli had a few of his own menu suggestions that are totally attainable for us East Coasters and can enable us to capture the essence of awards season, even if we’re thousands of miles away from the red carpet action.

For starters, he proposed a “perfect Italian aperitivo.” “You can start the party with a Parma Ham (prosciutto) and mozzarella with some olives and a glass of Ferrari,” he said. “Also, you can add a touch of Parmesan, which is another great pairing.”

“I like to pair pizza and sparkling wine,” he suggested as another possibility. “In Italy, we like to call it ‘pizza e bollicina,’ which is pizza and bubbles. Probably people here think of pizza with beer, but a pizza margherita with Ferrari Trento Rose is great.”

“If you like seafood, something that I love is fried seafood, like fried squid or calamari, and Ferrari,” he added. “Whenever you have something fried, if you pair it with wine with the right acidity, it changes your mouth and creates a very positive sensation.

“In general, I think it’s about people wanting to be with each other and wanting to share.”


A look at the Emmys’ Governors Ball and how to throw an epic awards party

The 71st Emmy Awards was so good, we could taste it. Literally.

While celebrating the 2019 winners with the stars themselves and Tinseltown notables at the annual Governors Ball, The Track chatted with Matteo Lunelli of Ferrari Trento, the Emmys’ official sparkling wine, about the spread at this year’s after-party and how Hollywood-watchers can channel its spirit in their own bashes during awards season.

“It’s a mix of glamor and Hollywood, with a touch of Italian lifestyle,” Lunelli told the Track of the rooftop shindig taking place directly after the Los Angeles ceremony on Sunday night.

“It’s a tradition about celebrating life and emotions,” he added. “It’s about the pleasure to share positive emotions with other people. The attention that Italians put on food and wine is usually because it’s what you share with the people you love.”

The Track witnessed plenty of positive emotions, as the likes of “Fleabag” winner Phoebe Waller-Bridge, late-night great and presenter Jimmy Kimmel and “Veep” star Julia Louis-Dreyfus sipped on the imported bubbly and downed bites prepared by James Beard legend Joachim Splichal. The swanky soiree, which veered from its traditional sit-down structure for the first time, was strewn with selections of small bites, including: stations laden with sliders and homemade chips, as well as carved prime rib with potatoes au gratin passed trays of street corn ravioli, miniature crab cake sandwiches, Kobe beef meatballs, Brussels sprout frites, Maine lobster dalloped with burrata, paella Valencia and chicken croquettes in addition to Viennese tables covered with the cutest assortment of tiny sweets, such as gold-dusted pots de crème, chocolate-shelled tartlets and raspberry chia seed tapioca pudding.

Obviously, most of us nonfamous folks won’t likely be munching on any precious metals at our own watch-parties as we now follow along the trail to the Oscars. But Lunelli stressed that the key to these bashes is merely embracing the beauty of life. This oh-so Italian philosophy stretches beyond the glitzy, 3,000-guest blowouts like the post-Emmy bash and places simplicity on an equally high pedestal.

To emphasize his point, Lunelli had a few of his own menu suggestions that are totally attainable for us East Coasters and can enable us to capture the essence of awards season, even if we’re thousands of miles away from the red carpet action.

For starters, he proposed a “perfect Italian aperitivo.” “You can start the party with a Parma Ham (prosciutto) and mozzarella with some olives and a glass of Ferrari,” he said. “Also, you can add a touch of Parmesan, which is another great pairing.”

“I like to pair pizza and sparkling wine,” he suggested as another possibility. “In Italy, we like to call it ‘pizza e bollicina,’ which is pizza and bubbles. Probably people here think of pizza with beer, but a pizza margherita with Ferrari Trento Rose is great.”

“If you like seafood, something that I love is fried seafood, like fried squid or calamari, and Ferrari,” he added. “Whenever you have something fried, if you pair it with wine with the right acidity, it changes your mouth and creates a very positive sensation.

“In general, I think it’s about people wanting to be with each other and wanting to share.”


A look at the Emmys’ Governors Ball and how to throw an epic awards party

The 71st Emmy Awards was so good, we could taste it. Literally.

While celebrating the 2019 winners with the stars themselves and Tinseltown notables at the annual Governors Ball, The Track chatted with Matteo Lunelli of Ferrari Trento, the Emmys’ official sparkling wine, about the spread at this year’s after-party and how Hollywood-watchers can channel its spirit in their own bashes during awards season.

“It’s a mix of glamor and Hollywood, with a touch of Italian lifestyle,” Lunelli told the Track of the rooftop shindig taking place directly after the Los Angeles ceremony on Sunday night.

“It’s a tradition about celebrating life and emotions,” he added. “It’s about the pleasure to share positive emotions with other people. The attention that Italians put on food and wine is usually because it’s what you share with the people you love.”

The Track witnessed plenty of positive emotions, as the likes of “Fleabag” winner Phoebe Waller-Bridge, late-night great and presenter Jimmy Kimmel and “Veep” star Julia Louis-Dreyfus sipped on the imported bubbly and downed bites prepared by James Beard legend Joachim Splichal. The swanky soiree, which veered from its traditional sit-down structure for the first time, was strewn with selections of small bites, including: stations laden with sliders and homemade chips, as well as carved prime rib with potatoes au gratin passed trays of street corn ravioli, miniature crab cake sandwiches, Kobe beef meatballs, Brussels sprout frites, Maine lobster dalloped with burrata, paella Valencia and chicken croquettes in addition to Viennese tables covered with the cutest assortment of tiny sweets, such as gold-dusted pots de crème, chocolate-shelled tartlets and raspberry chia seed tapioca pudding.

Obviously, most of us nonfamous folks won’t likely be munching on any precious metals at our own watch-parties as we now follow along the trail to the Oscars. But Lunelli stressed that the key to these bashes is merely embracing the beauty of life. This oh-so Italian philosophy stretches beyond the glitzy, 3,000-guest blowouts like the post-Emmy bash and places simplicity on an equally high pedestal.

To emphasize his point, Lunelli had a few of his own menu suggestions that are totally attainable for us East Coasters and can enable us to capture the essence of awards season, even if we’re thousands of miles away from the red carpet action.

For starters, he proposed a “perfect Italian aperitivo.” “You can start the party with a Parma Ham (prosciutto) and mozzarella with some olives and a glass of Ferrari,” he said. “Also, you can add a touch of Parmesan, which is another great pairing.”

“I like to pair pizza and sparkling wine,” he suggested as another possibility. “In Italy, we like to call it ‘pizza e bollicina,’ which is pizza and bubbles. Probably people here think of pizza with beer, but a pizza margherita with Ferrari Trento Rose is great.”

“If you like seafood, something that I love is fried seafood, like fried squid or calamari, and Ferrari,” he added. “Whenever you have something fried, if you pair it with wine with the right acidity, it changes your mouth and creates a very positive sensation.

“In general, I think it’s about people wanting to be with each other and wanting to share.”


A look at the Emmys’ Governors Ball and how to throw an epic awards party

The 71st Emmy Awards was so good, we could taste it. Literally.

While celebrating the 2019 winners with the stars themselves and Tinseltown notables at the annual Governors Ball, The Track chatted with Matteo Lunelli of Ferrari Trento, the Emmys’ official sparkling wine, about the spread at this year’s after-party and how Hollywood-watchers can channel its spirit in their own bashes during awards season.

“It’s a mix of glamor and Hollywood, with a touch of Italian lifestyle,” Lunelli told the Track of the rooftop shindig taking place directly after the Los Angeles ceremony on Sunday night.

“It’s a tradition about celebrating life and emotions,” he added. “It’s about the pleasure to share positive emotions with other people. The attention that Italians put on food and wine is usually because it’s what you share with the people you love.”

The Track witnessed plenty of positive emotions, as the likes of “Fleabag” winner Phoebe Waller-Bridge, late-night great and presenter Jimmy Kimmel and “Veep” star Julia Louis-Dreyfus sipped on the imported bubbly and downed bites prepared by James Beard legend Joachim Splichal. The swanky soiree, which veered from its traditional sit-down structure for the first time, was strewn with selections of small bites, including: stations laden with sliders and homemade chips, as well as carved prime rib with potatoes au gratin passed trays of street corn ravioli, miniature crab cake sandwiches, Kobe beef meatballs, Brussels sprout frites, Maine lobster dalloped with burrata, paella Valencia and chicken croquettes in addition to Viennese tables covered with the cutest assortment of tiny sweets, such as gold-dusted pots de crème, chocolate-shelled tartlets and raspberry chia seed tapioca pudding.

Obviously, most of us nonfamous folks won’t likely be munching on any precious metals at our own watch-parties as we now follow along the trail to the Oscars. But Lunelli stressed that the key to these bashes is merely embracing the beauty of life. This oh-so Italian philosophy stretches beyond the glitzy, 3,000-guest blowouts like the post-Emmy bash and places simplicity on an equally high pedestal.

To emphasize his point, Lunelli had a few of his own menu suggestions that are totally attainable for us East Coasters and can enable us to capture the essence of awards season, even if we’re thousands of miles away from the red carpet action.

For starters, he proposed a “perfect Italian aperitivo.” “You can start the party with a Parma Ham (prosciutto) and mozzarella with some olives and a glass of Ferrari,” he said. “Also, you can add a touch of Parmesan, which is another great pairing.”

“I like to pair pizza and sparkling wine,” he suggested as another possibility. “In Italy, we like to call it ‘pizza e bollicina,’ which is pizza and bubbles. Probably people here think of pizza with beer, but a pizza margherita with Ferrari Trento Rose is great.”

“If you like seafood, something that I love is fried seafood, like fried squid or calamari, and Ferrari,” he added. “Whenever you have something fried, if you pair it with wine with the right acidity, it changes your mouth and creates a very positive sensation.

“In general, I think it’s about people wanting to be with each other and wanting to share.”


A look at the Emmys’ Governors Ball and how to throw an epic awards party

The 71st Emmy Awards was so good, we could taste it. Literally.

While celebrating the 2019 winners with the stars themselves and Tinseltown notables at the annual Governors Ball, The Track chatted with Matteo Lunelli of Ferrari Trento, the Emmys’ official sparkling wine, about the spread at this year’s after-party and how Hollywood-watchers can channel its spirit in their own bashes during awards season.

“It’s a mix of glamor and Hollywood, with a touch of Italian lifestyle,” Lunelli told the Track of the rooftop shindig taking place directly after the Los Angeles ceremony on Sunday night.

“It’s a tradition about celebrating life and emotions,” he added. “It’s about the pleasure to share positive emotions with other people. The attention that Italians put on food and wine is usually because it’s what you share with the people you love.”

The Track witnessed plenty of positive emotions, as the likes of “Fleabag” winner Phoebe Waller-Bridge, late-night great and presenter Jimmy Kimmel and “Veep” star Julia Louis-Dreyfus sipped on the imported bubbly and downed bites prepared by James Beard legend Joachim Splichal. The swanky soiree, which veered from its traditional sit-down structure for the first time, was strewn with selections of small bites, including: stations laden with sliders and homemade chips, as well as carved prime rib with potatoes au gratin passed trays of street corn ravioli, miniature crab cake sandwiches, Kobe beef meatballs, Brussels sprout frites, Maine lobster dalloped with burrata, paella Valencia and chicken croquettes in addition to Viennese tables covered with the cutest assortment of tiny sweets, such as gold-dusted pots de crème, chocolate-shelled tartlets and raspberry chia seed tapioca pudding.

Obviously, most of us nonfamous folks won’t likely be munching on any precious metals at our own watch-parties as we now follow along the trail to the Oscars. But Lunelli stressed that the key to these bashes is merely embracing the beauty of life. This oh-so Italian philosophy stretches beyond the glitzy, 3,000-guest blowouts like the post-Emmy bash and places simplicity on an equally high pedestal.

To emphasize his point, Lunelli had a few of his own menu suggestions that are totally attainable for us East Coasters and can enable us to capture the essence of awards season, even if we’re thousands of miles away from the red carpet action.

For starters, he proposed a “perfect Italian aperitivo.” “You can start the party with a Parma Ham (prosciutto) and mozzarella with some olives and a glass of Ferrari,” he said. “Also, you can add a touch of Parmesan, which is another great pairing.”

“I like to pair pizza and sparkling wine,” he suggested as another possibility. “In Italy, we like to call it ‘pizza e bollicina,’ which is pizza and bubbles. Probably people here think of pizza with beer, but a pizza margherita with Ferrari Trento Rose is great.”

“If you like seafood, something that I love is fried seafood, like fried squid or calamari, and Ferrari,” he added. “Whenever you have something fried, if you pair it with wine with the right acidity, it changes your mouth and creates a very positive sensation.

“In general, I think it’s about people wanting to be with each other and wanting to share.”


A look at the Emmys’ Governors Ball and how to throw an epic awards party

The 71st Emmy Awards was so good, we could taste it. Literally.

While celebrating the 2019 winners with the stars themselves and Tinseltown notables at the annual Governors Ball, The Track chatted with Matteo Lunelli of Ferrari Trento, the Emmys’ official sparkling wine, about the spread at this year’s after-party and how Hollywood-watchers can channel its spirit in their own bashes during awards season.

“It’s a mix of glamor and Hollywood, with a touch of Italian lifestyle,” Lunelli told the Track of the rooftop shindig taking place directly after the Los Angeles ceremony on Sunday night.

“It’s a tradition about celebrating life and emotions,” he added. “It’s about the pleasure to share positive emotions with other people. The attention that Italians put on food and wine is usually because it’s what you share with the people you love.”

The Track witnessed plenty of positive emotions, as the likes of “Fleabag” winner Phoebe Waller-Bridge, late-night great and presenter Jimmy Kimmel and “Veep” star Julia Louis-Dreyfus sipped on the imported bubbly and downed bites prepared by James Beard legend Joachim Splichal. The swanky soiree, which veered from its traditional sit-down structure for the first time, was strewn with selections of small bites, including: stations laden with sliders and homemade chips, as well as carved prime rib with potatoes au gratin passed trays of street corn ravioli, miniature crab cake sandwiches, Kobe beef meatballs, Brussels sprout frites, Maine lobster dalloped with burrata, paella Valencia and chicken croquettes in addition to Viennese tables covered with the cutest assortment of tiny sweets, such as gold-dusted pots de crème, chocolate-shelled tartlets and raspberry chia seed tapioca pudding.

Obviously, most of us nonfamous folks won’t likely be munching on any precious metals at our own watch-parties as we now follow along the trail to the Oscars. But Lunelli stressed that the key to these bashes is merely embracing the beauty of life. This oh-so Italian philosophy stretches beyond the glitzy, 3,000-guest blowouts like the post-Emmy bash and places simplicity on an equally high pedestal.

To emphasize his point, Lunelli had a few of his own menu suggestions that are totally attainable for us East Coasters and can enable us to capture the essence of awards season, even if we’re thousands of miles away from the red carpet action.

For starters, he proposed a “perfect Italian aperitivo.” “You can start the party with a Parma Ham (prosciutto) and mozzarella with some olives and a glass of Ferrari,” he said. “Also, you can add a touch of Parmesan, which is another great pairing.”

“I like to pair pizza and sparkling wine,” he suggested as another possibility. “In Italy, we like to call it ‘pizza e bollicina,’ which is pizza and bubbles. Probably people here think of pizza with beer, but a pizza margherita with Ferrari Trento Rose is great.”

“If you like seafood, something that I love is fried seafood, like fried squid or calamari, and Ferrari,” he added. “Whenever you have something fried, if you pair it with wine with the right acidity, it changes your mouth and creates a very positive sensation.

“In general, I think it’s about people wanting to be with each other and wanting to share.”


A look at the Emmys’ Governors Ball and how to throw an epic awards party

The 71st Emmy Awards was so good, we could taste it. Literally.

While celebrating the 2019 winners with the stars themselves and Tinseltown notables at the annual Governors Ball, The Track chatted with Matteo Lunelli of Ferrari Trento, the Emmys’ official sparkling wine, about the spread at this year’s after-party and how Hollywood-watchers can channel its spirit in their own bashes during awards season.

“It’s a mix of glamor and Hollywood, with a touch of Italian lifestyle,” Lunelli told the Track of the rooftop shindig taking place directly after the Los Angeles ceremony on Sunday night.

“It’s a tradition about celebrating life and emotions,” he added. “It’s about the pleasure to share positive emotions with other people. The attention that Italians put on food and wine is usually because it’s what you share with the people you love.”

The Track witnessed plenty of positive emotions, as the likes of “Fleabag” winner Phoebe Waller-Bridge, late-night great and presenter Jimmy Kimmel and “Veep” star Julia Louis-Dreyfus sipped on the imported bubbly and downed bites prepared by James Beard legend Joachim Splichal. The swanky soiree, which veered from its traditional sit-down structure for the first time, was strewn with selections of small bites, including: stations laden with sliders and homemade chips, as well as carved prime rib with potatoes au gratin passed trays of street corn ravioli, miniature crab cake sandwiches, Kobe beef meatballs, Brussels sprout frites, Maine lobster dalloped with burrata, paella Valencia and chicken croquettes in addition to Viennese tables covered with the cutest assortment of tiny sweets, such as gold-dusted pots de crème, chocolate-shelled tartlets and raspberry chia seed tapioca pudding.

Obviously, most of us nonfamous folks won’t likely be munching on any precious metals at our own watch-parties as we now follow along the trail to the Oscars. But Lunelli stressed that the key to these bashes is merely embracing the beauty of life. This oh-so Italian philosophy stretches beyond the glitzy, 3,000-guest blowouts like the post-Emmy bash and places simplicity on an equally high pedestal.

To emphasize his point, Lunelli had a few of his own menu suggestions that are totally attainable for us East Coasters and can enable us to capture the essence of awards season, even if we’re thousands of miles away from the red carpet action.

For starters, he proposed a “perfect Italian aperitivo.” “You can start the party with a Parma Ham (prosciutto) and mozzarella with some olives and a glass of Ferrari,” he said. “Also, you can add a touch of Parmesan, which is another great pairing.”

“I like to pair pizza and sparkling wine,” he suggested as another possibility. “In Italy, we like to call it ‘pizza e bollicina,’ which is pizza and bubbles. Probably people here think of pizza with beer, but a pizza margherita with Ferrari Trento Rose is great.”

“If you like seafood, something that I love is fried seafood, like fried squid or calamari, and Ferrari,” he added. “Whenever you have something fried, if you pair it with wine with the right acidity, it changes your mouth and creates a very positive sensation.

“In general, I think it’s about people wanting to be with each other and wanting to share.”


A look at the Emmys’ Governors Ball and how to throw an epic awards party

The 71st Emmy Awards was so good, we could taste it. Literally.

While celebrating the 2019 winners with the stars themselves and Tinseltown notables at the annual Governors Ball, The Track chatted with Matteo Lunelli of Ferrari Trento, the Emmys’ official sparkling wine, about the spread at this year’s after-party and how Hollywood-watchers can channel its spirit in their own bashes during awards season.

“It’s a mix of glamor and Hollywood, with a touch of Italian lifestyle,” Lunelli told the Track of the rooftop shindig taking place directly after the Los Angeles ceremony on Sunday night.

“It’s a tradition about celebrating life and emotions,” he added. “It’s about the pleasure to share positive emotions with other people. The attention that Italians put on food and wine is usually because it’s what you share with the people you love.”

The Track witnessed plenty of positive emotions, as the likes of “Fleabag” winner Phoebe Waller-Bridge, late-night great and presenter Jimmy Kimmel and “Veep” star Julia Louis-Dreyfus sipped on the imported bubbly and downed bites prepared by James Beard legend Joachim Splichal. The swanky soiree, which veered from its traditional sit-down structure for the first time, was strewn with selections of small bites, including: stations laden with sliders and homemade chips, as well as carved prime rib with potatoes au gratin passed trays of street corn ravioli, miniature crab cake sandwiches, Kobe beef meatballs, Brussels sprout frites, Maine lobster dalloped with burrata, paella Valencia and chicken croquettes in addition to Viennese tables covered with the cutest assortment of tiny sweets, such as gold-dusted pots de crème, chocolate-shelled tartlets and raspberry chia seed tapioca pudding.

Obviously, most of us nonfamous folks won’t likely be munching on any precious metals at our own watch-parties as we now follow along the trail to the Oscars. But Lunelli stressed that the key to these bashes is merely embracing the beauty of life. This oh-so Italian philosophy stretches beyond the glitzy, 3,000-guest blowouts like the post-Emmy bash and places simplicity on an equally high pedestal.

To emphasize his point, Lunelli had a few of his own menu suggestions that are totally attainable for us East Coasters and can enable us to capture the essence of awards season, even if we’re thousands of miles away from the red carpet action.

For starters, he proposed a “perfect Italian aperitivo.” “You can start the party with a Parma Ham (prosciutto) and mozzarella with some olives and a glass of Ferrari,” he said. “Also, you can add a touch of Parmesan, which is another great pairing.”

“I like to pair pizza and sparkling wine,” he suggested as another possibility. “In Italy, we like to call it ‘pizza e bollicina,’ which is pizza and bubbles. Probably people here think of pizza with beer, but a pizza margherita with Ferrari Trento Rose is great.”

“If you like seafood, something that I love is fried seafood, like fried squid or calamari, and Ferrari,” he added. “Whenever you have something fried, if you pair it with wine with the right acidity, it changes your mouth and creates a very positive sensation.

“In general, I think it’s about people wanting to be with each other and wanting to share.”


A look at the Emmys’ Governors Ball and how to throw an epic awards party

The 71st Emmy Awards was so good, we could taste it. Literally.

While celebrating the 2019 winners with the stars themselves and Tinseltown notables at the annual Governors Ball, The Track chatted with Matteo Lunelli of Ferrari Trento, the Emmys’ official sparkling wine, about the spread at this year’s after-party and how Hollywood-watchers can channel its spirit in their own bashes during awards season.

“It’s a mix of glamor and Hollywood, with a touch of Italian lifestyle,” Lunelli told the Track of the rooftop shindig taking place directly after the Los Angeles ceremony on Sunday night.

“It’s a tradition about celebrating life and emotions,” he added. “It’s about the pleasure to share positive emotions with other people. The attention that Italians put on food and wine is usually because it’s what you share with the people you love.”

The Track witnessed plenty of positive emotions, as the likes of “Fleabag” winner Phoebe Waller-Bridge, late-night great and presenter Jimmy Kimmel and “Veep” star Julia Louis-Dreyfus sipped on the imported bubbly and downed bites prepared by James Beard legend Joachim Splichal. The swanky soiree, which veered from its traditional sit-down structure for the first time, was strewn with selections of small bites, including: stations laden with sliders and homemade chips, as well as carved prime rib with potatoes au gratin passed trays of street corn ravioli, miniature crab cake sandwiches, Kobe beef meatballs, Brussels sprout frites, Maine lobster dalloped with burrata, paella Valencia and chicken croquettes in addition to Viennese tables covered with the cutest assortment of tiny sweets, such as gold-dusted pots de crème, chocolate-shelled tartlets and raspberry chia seed tapioca pudding.

Obviously, most of us nonfamous folks won’t likely be munching on any precious metals at our own watch-parties as we now follow along the trail to the Oscars. But Lunelli stressed that the key to these bashes is merely embracing the beauty of life. This oh-so Italian philosophy stretches beyond the glitzy, 3,000-guest blowouts like the post-Emmy bash and places simplicity on an equally high pedestal.

To emphasize his point, Lunelli had a few of his own menu suggestions that are totally attainable for us East Coasters and can enable us to capture the essence of awards season, even if we’re thousands of miles away from the red carpet action.

For starters, he proposed a “perfect Italian aperitivo.” “You can start the party with a Parma Ham (prosciutto) and mozzarella with some olives and a glass of Ferrari,” he said. “Also, you can add a touch of Parmesan, which is another great pairing.”

“I like to pair pizza and sparkling wine,” he suggested as another possibility. “In Italy, we like to call it ‘pizza e bollicina,’ which is pizza and bubbles. Probably people here think of pizza with beer, but a pizza margherita with Ferrari Trento Rose is great.”

“If you like seafood, something that I love is fried seafood, like fried squid or calamari, and Ferrari,” he added. “Whenever you have something fried, if you pair it with wine with the right acidity, it changes your mouth and creates a very positive sensation.

“In general, I think it’s about people wanting to be with each other and wanting to share.”


Watch the video: Golden Globe Awards 2014: Τα βραβεία (November 2021).